The house was plundered and almost burnt by Gordon of Glenbucket's Highlanders in the 'Forty-five,' and only saved by the presence of mind of 'the Lady Kinmundy,' whose husband was absent, and whose young son had been hurriedly despatched to a neighbouring farmhouse concealed in a clothes-basket. She sent a message to the officer in command to the effect that it was strange conduct on the part of a gentleman so to treat a lady's house; that she had just been preparing some refreshment for his men when they set fire to the part of the house where it was to be served, and that if they wanted their dinner they had better put the fire out. The same good lady on another occasion, when a recruiting party were forcibly impressing the young men around, and some of them asked protection, is said to have put the house in a state of defence, and answered the summons to surrender the fugitives with the reply, ' Her people had come there for safety, and safety they should have, and before they were got the house must be knocked down.' [Records, p. 267]

Ferguson of Kinmundy

References

  1. Records of the Clan and Name of Fergusson, Ferguson and Fergus, by James Ferguson and Robert Menzies Fergusson, Edinburgh, 1895.
  2. Records of the Clan and Name of Fergusson, Ferguson and Fergus Supplement, by James Ferguson and Robert Menzies Fergusson, Edinburgh, 1899
  3. Ferguson of Kinmundy papers, GB 0231 Aberdeen University, Special Libraries and Archives
  4. Ferguson of Kinmundy: letters 1794-1801, GB233/MS.9050 National Library of Scotland Reference
  5. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry 1952


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